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Fluigent Anniversary, Replay of the lectures

Fluigent 15th anniversary reception

This year marks the 15th Anniversary of the founding of Fluigent.

From our small beginning as a spin-out from the Curie Institute, we have now shipped more than 6,000 instruments to customers in more than 50 countries.

During the last years, we have expanded the size of our teams in the US, Germany, as well as in France to provide the most innovative products, and to strengthen our technical support to better serve our growing customer base.

We have took this occasion to celebrate Microfluidics and the expansion of its applications and usages by organizing two scientific conferences with main Key Opinion Leaders.

During two days, we hosted 6 lectures from prominent scientists in microfluidics. 

Séverine Le Gac, Charles Baroud, Raphaël Tomasi, David A. Weitz, Dimitrios Lamprou, Andrew deMello and Jean-Louis Viovy inspired more than 300 attendees with their knowledge and vision. 

Here you can see photos and videos of the cocktail party and product demonstrations but also replay of the lectures of the most important actors in the field of microfluidics.

Replay of the lectures

Severine Le Gac

Cartilage-on-chip platform - A physiologically inspired platform to reproduce articular joint compression and shear strain

Dr. Le Gac is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Twente (The Netherlands) and is leading a research group Applied Microfluidics for BioEngineering Research (AMBER). Her research interests focus on the use of microfluidic devices for biological and medical applications, including cancer research, assisted reproductive technologies.Prof. Le Gac is associate editor of the journals Lab on a Chip and Biomedical Microdevices. And co-editor-in-chief of the journal Organs-on-a-Chip. She is also member of the director board of the Chemical Biological Microsystem Society (CBMS).

Charles Baroud

Droplet microfluidics driven by confinement gradients : from research to cancer in vitro diagnostics

Charles Baroud is the Co-founder and Advisor at Okomera. He is a professor at École Polytechnique, and a team leader at Institut Pasteur, with +60 peer-reviewed publications and several patents (including Okomera’s patents). He is the co-inventor of the technology. He is also one of the founders of Stilla Technologies.

David A. Weitz

New probes of fluids at the microscale

David Weitz is a professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University. His research efforts include soft matter physics, biophysics and biotechnology. He is Director of Harvard’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, co-Director of the BASF Advanced Research Initiative and a member of the National Academies of Science and the American Academy of Arts and Science.

Dimitrios Lamprou

Microfluidics in Nanomedicine

Dimitrios Lamprou (Ph.D. MBA) is Reader in Pharmaceutical Engineering and Programme Director at MSc Industrial Pharmaceutics at the School of Pharmacy in Queen’s University Belfast (UK). His research and academic leadership have been recognised in a range of awards, including the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Science Award and the Scottish Universities Life Sciences Alliance Leaders Scheme Award. Dimitrios research lab is applying Nano and Microfabrication Techniques (e.g., 3D Printing & Bioprinting, Electrospinning, Microfluidics & Lab-on-a-chip) in the Manufacturing of Drug Delivery Systems, Medical Devices & Implants.

Jean Louis Viovy

Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic forces for sample prep and point-of-use microfluidics

Polymer physicist by initial training, Jean Louis Viovy is a microfluidics specialist, and currently Research Director Emeritus at CNRS and Curie Institute. He has cofounded Institute Pierre Gilles de Gennes for Microfluidics (IPGG) in 2011. His research interests focus on lab-on-chips, bioanalytical methods, translational medicine. e.g. through the study of DNA-protein transactions involved in cancer and diagnosis methods relevant to cancer or for other types of pathologies such as Alzheimer or infectious diseases.

Andrew DeMello

Microfluidics for high-throughput chemistry and biology

Andrew deMello is a professor of Biochemical Engineering in the Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences at ETH Zurich and Head of the Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering. He is also co-founder of Molecular Vision Ltd, an Imperial College spin-out company developing low-cost diagnostic devices for use in doctor’s surgery and at home. His research interests cover a broad range of activities in the general area of microfluidics and nanoscale science.

Charles Baroud

interface between quantitative biology using physical methods

He talks to us about the interface between quantitative biology using physical methods to manipulate the cells and the droplets, and mathematical modeling to analyze the measurements.

For him, one of the challenges in therm of developing technologies is to integrate more and more complex biological protocols in easy-to-use devices.

Séverine le Gac

microfluidics for cartillage on chip applications

Her research interests focus on the use of microfluidic devices for biological and medical applications, including cancer research, Cartilage On A Chip, and assisted reproductive technologies.

She explains how Fluigent instruments help in her research:
to apply mechanical stimulation on cells for cartilage applications
to establish communication between different Organ On Chip devices.

Jean Louis VIOVY

New microfluidic technologies development

His research interests focus on the development of new microfluidic technologies for applications, mostly in life sciences.

He explains the advantages of Fluigent instruments in his research:
the high precision and the fast response time of pressure based controllers, the ease of use and the high modularity compared to other pressure-based systems

Anthony Treizebre

Microfluidic for blood-vessel-on-chip applications

His research interests focus on the development of new microfluidic technologies for applications, mostly in life sciences.

He explains the advantages of Fluigent instruments in his research:
the high precision and the fast response time of pressure based controllers, the ease of use and the high modularity compared to other pressure-based systems

pictures of the event

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